Advertising examples with alliteration

Alliterative advertising can be a bit tricky to construct, but it’s worth the effort.

Let’s take a look at some good examples of alliterative advertising.

Coca-Cola

The Coca-Cola company has a great line in alliteration that’s been in the ads for decades, but now it’s the tagline for a new ad campaign.

The line is “Share a Coke with a friend,” which is a great alliteration in the sense that it’s the perfect combination of words. You can use it as a tagline or a slogan.

Pepsi

Pepsi’s slogan, “It’s alive.” is an excellent example of how alliteration can be used in advertising, and it’s quite clever.

The words “It” and “alive” are different in sound, but they’re both short, powerful words that make an impact.

Pepsi knows that its customers are not dumb. So they understand that their product is alive, and their slogan is a reminder for customers that they have a product to sell.

Gatorade

Here’s a great example of how alliteration can be used in advertising.

Gatorade calls themselves the “World’s Largest Sport Drink Company” and they use alliteration to draw the attention of their audience.

As you can see, the words “World,” “Largest,” and “Sport Drink” are different in sound, but they’re all a reminder for their audience that they have a product to sell.

The ads are quite simple in their design, and they have one message: they’re a great sports drink.

Apple

Apple has a great tagline that’s been used in their ads for years, but now they’re using alliteration in their new ads.

The tagline is “Think Different,” which is an interesting combination of words. It’s an alliteration in that it uses different words to represent the same idea.

The words “Think” and “different” are different in sound, but they’re both short words that convey the same idea.

The Apple ads are simple, and they have one message: to think differently.

Starbucks

Starbucks’ tagline, “A Cup Where You Live,” is an excellent example of how alliteration can be used in advertising, and it’s quite clever.

This is an example of alliteration in that it uses different words to represent the same idea.

The words “A” and “Cup” are different in sound, but they both represent the idea of staying at home.

As you can see, this tagline is a great reminder for customers that they have a product to sell.

The fact that the words “A Cup” and “Where” are different in sound is a great example of how alliteration can be used in advertising.

The reason that alliteration is so brilliant in this case is because the words “A Cup” and “Where” are different, yet they’re both short words that convey the same idea.

So, let’s look at some examples of advertising that use alliteration in their design.

Alliteration in advertising examples that are memorable

The words used in most advertising campaigns are short, powerful words that are remembered by their audience.

So, let’s look at some examples of alliteration in advertising.

Monsanto

Monsanto is an agricultural company, and one of their slogans, “Chemical Freedom,” is a great example of how alliteration can be used in advertising.

The words “Freedom” and “Chemical” are different in sound, but they’re both powerful words that convey the same idea.

Monsanto knows that its audience is aware of the dangers of chemical fertilizer, so they use alliteration to remind them of their product.

General Mills

General Mills uses alliteration in their ads to reinforce the idea of wholesome food.

General Mills’ slogan, “Baked is Better,” is an excellent example of how alliteration can be used in advertising, and it’s quite clever.

The words “Baked” and “is” are different in sound, but they’re both short, powerful words that convey the same thought.

General Mills knows that its audience is familiar with baked goods, so they use alliteration to remind them of their product.

Burger King

Burger King knows that their ad slogan, “The Best Thing I Ever Ate,” is memorable and appealing to their audience.

The words “Best” and “Thing” are different in sound, but they’re both short, powerful words that convey the same thought.

Burger King knows that their audience is familiar with the phrase “The Best Thing I Ever Ate,” so they use alliteration in their ads to reinforce the idea.

The words “Thing” and “Ever” are different in sound, but they’re both short, powerful words that convey the same idea.

Now, let’s look at some examples of advertising that use alliteration in their design.

Alliteration in advertising examples that are creative

Let’s look at some examples of advertising that use alliteration in their design to make their ads more creative.

Dove

Dove has a great slogan that’s been used in their ads for years, “Fresh, Clean, Sexy.”

The words “Fresh,” “Clean,” and “Sexy” are different in sound, but they’re all short, powerful words that convey the same idea.

Dove knows that its audience is familiar with the words “Fresh,” “Clean,” and “Sexy,” so they use alliteration to reinforce the idea of freshness, cleanliness, and sexiness.

Taco Bell

Taco Bell’s tagline, “Good Times,” is an excellent example of alliteration in advertising.

As you can see, the words “Good” and “Times” are different in sound, but they’re both short, powerful words that convey the same thought.

Taco Bell knows that its audience is familiar with the phrase “Good Times,” so they use alliteration in their ads to reinforce the ideas.

The idea behind Taco Bell’s tagline is to keep their audience from having bad times, which is why they use alliteration to remind them of the good times.

How to use alliteration in your advertising?

Let’s look at some examples of how alliteration in advertising can be used.

Alliteration in advertising examples that are clever

Now let’s look at some examples of how alliteration can be used in advertising.

What’s the takeaway?

Alliteration is very versatile in advertising. It uses different words to represent the same idea, and it’s a great way to use your audience’s knowledge of a specific product or service in your ads.

Alliteration is a powerful tool, and it can be used in advertising to help you reinforce your message, create memorable advertising, and create a brand that’s relatable to your audience.

The word “Think” can be used by brands to convey the idea of being innovative and to show off their product.

Images by Freepik

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