Schema marketing definition

Schema Marking: A Structured Data Markup System for Content Management. A structured data markup system that lets you create rich, interactive, reusable, shareable content.

Schema.org: The web’s most used structured data markup framework. It’s used by hundreds of the world’s most influential sites such as Wikipedia, The New York Times, and the BBC.

Microdata: A markup system for describing specific, small pieces of content that are relevant to a user’s context, such as the first sentence of a blog post.

Microformats: A markup system for describing a particular piece of content in a specific context. For a blog post, the context could be the blog post’s author, the date it was published, an individual URL in the post, or a specific piece of content within the post.

RSS: A web feed service that lets you syndicate and share content on your website. It’s the preferred method of syndicating and sharing content on the web.

Rich Snippets: A snippet of text that includes a rich answer. For example, a paragraph containing a link to the author’s website.

Social sharing: A process of sharing content with other people, even people who don’t follow you.

Twitter: A social media service that lets people share and follow each other’s tweets.

Rich results: A combination of your search results that contains structured data. These rich results are results where there are more than one answer. For example, a first search result containing a link containing two different URLs.

What’s a schema mark?

A schema mark is a code snippet that allows you to create structured data on your site. For example, if you’re a restaurant, you might use a schema mark like this:

  • Schema mark

Google uses schema mark to display rich snippets on search results pages. The rich snippets are a collection of additional elements that show up on search results. These snippets can include rich snippets that are associated with images, videos, review stars, and more.

You can use schema mark to enrich your content. For example, you can use schema mark to create rich results that include reviews.

Schema mark is just one markup tool. There are other tools for schema mark. We’ll cover those in the next chapter.

A markup tool and a markup framework

Google’s search results are structured data. They include rich results. Other markup tools let you create rich results. These markup tools also include a framework for creating rich results.

You can create rich results using a schema mark. You can also create rich results using Microdata, Microformats, and RSS.

Microdata is the least popular markup tool. It’s very popular for rich snippets and review stars.

Microformats is the most popular markup tool. It’s popular because it’s easier to use than Microdata and it uses the same syntax. There’s a lot of overlap between using Microformats and using Schema Mark.

Microformats has some significant differences from Schema Mark. They use the same syntax, but they aren’t quite the same. The most significant difference is that Schema Mark uses a slightly different markup.

RSS is a markup tool that’s less popular than other markup tools. You might use it to create a feed.

This markup tool allows you to create a feed similar to a microformats feed.

There are three main types of schema mark

  • Microdata

Microdata and the other schema marks are used to create rich snippets. Schema mark is used to create rich results.

  • Microformats

Microformats are used to create rich snippets and microdata rich results.

Microformats are also used to create feeds. You can create a feed that includes microformats.

Microformats are very similar to Schema Mark. Microformats use a slightly different syntax that uses open-type, which means it’s more flexible.

RSS is a popular example of a markup tool. It lets you create a page-specific feed.

You might see it in action in an article where it’s used to create a feed.

Schema mark is a markup framework. It contains a set of elements that you use to create rich results. It includes a variety of elements.

These include the following:

  • Introduction: A header and subhead that tells search engines about your page and your structured data.
  • Keywords: A list of words that describe your page. Keywords aren’t a part of your page’s content.
  • Description: A page header that tells search engines about your page.
  • Data: The page’s content and structured data.
  • Links: A list of links to pages on your site that contain your structured data.
  • Images: The page’s content and structured data with an image.
  • Video: A page’s content and structured data with a video.
  • Reviews: A page’s content and structured data with a review star.
  • Social: A page’s content and structured data with a link to a social network.
  • More: More page content and structured data.

There are other elements. You can use Schema mark to create rich results.

We’ll look at these additional elements in the next chapter.

A structured data vocabulary

A structured data vocabulary is a set of rules that tell search engines how to interpret your structured data. The search engines use the vocabulary to understand the schema mark and how to display the structured data on search results.

There are a variety of structured data vocabularies. One of the most popular vocabulary is the Microdata.

An example schema mark

Let’s look at an example schema mark using Microdata.

Microdata is the most popular vocabulary because it’s easily understood. It uses a syntax that’s similar to HTML. The syntax is simple, and there’s a lot of overlap between using Microdata and using Schema mark.

Microdata uses the following vocabulary:

  • The introduction: A header and subhead that tells search engines about your content. It tells them that the content is about content and that it’s related to other content on your website.
  • The keywords: A list of words that describe your content. The keywords aren’t part of your content.
  • The description: A page header that tells search engines about your content.
  • The data: The page’s content and structured data.
  • The links: A list of links to pages on your website that contain your structured data.
  • The images: The page’s content and structured data with an image.
  • The video: A page’s content and structured data with a video.
  • The reviews: A page’s content and structured data with a review star.
  • The social: A page’s content and structured data with a link to a social network.

It also includes other vocabulary. You can use Microdata to create microdata rich results.

Microdata is the most popular vocabulary because it’s easy to understand and it’s popular. Most sites use it.

Microformats is a less popular vocabulary than Microdata. It’s used to create microdata rich results, but it’s not as popular. It’s used primarily to create feeds.

Microformats don’t use the same syntax as Microdata. It uses an extension of the syntax. It uses less of the standard syntax.

This means it’s easy to understand. It’s also used more frequently.

The syntax in Microformats is similar to the syntax in Microdata. However, it’s a little more complex.

To summarize

Microformats and Microtags are used to create microformat rich results.

Microformats and Microtags are used to create feeds.

Images by Freepik

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